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On the cover
7 (2014)
Tunnelling Towards Hope


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28 February - 6 March 2014

Ukraine History

A Stronghold of Rulers and Rebels

With the recent death toll jumping to nearly 100 and 1,000 injured, Hrushevskoho Street, one of the strongholds of EuroMaidans three-month-long protests, made headlines around the globe. It was here, on 19 January the countrys stand against government corruption, abuse of power, and the violation of human rights turned from peaceful protest to all-out revolution. Having witnessed much over the years, Hrushevskoho is a street with a history, and not only care of recent days.

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Ukraine Today
Acelebrity using their status and intelligence to influence public views and opinion is rarely seen in modern society, even less so in Ukraine. Here, the majority of celebs use their time, effort, and money to enhance or further their career rather than put their name to something that can do good for others. However, as EuroMaidan intensifies, some are making themselves heard and they fall either side of the EuroMaidan divide.
It used to be that when rebellion and revolution occurred, the intellectual, creative, and spiritual elite would be front and centre.

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Ukrainian Culture

When Walls Can Talk

People have been writing on walls since the dawn of civilisation, we call it graffiti, and ranges from simple written words to elaborate wall paintings. Sometimes it is merely the creator wanting to leave his or her mark; sometimes there is an underlying social or political reason. And it is due to the latter that graffiti has exploded across Kyiv in recent months. Anti dictator messages aside, we peel back a few layers of paint to look at graffiti in the city in general.

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Just a Minute

Provocations & Observations (#7)

Publishers Provocation
The feeling in Kyiv at the moment is a strange one. As I commented on Facebook while posting photos Id taken on Maidan on Monday of flowers stacked upon flowers, there is no sense of celebration or jubilation, only mourning. And yet usually, even when losses have been suffered, victories are celebrated. The fact that no one is celebrating now highlights the political maturity the people of Ukraine have now reached.

Ten years ago, the good people of this great land turned out in the hundreds of thousands to protest a fraudulent election result. Then, thankfully, the people won without bloodshed (although the man who subsequently came to power six years later wanted to spill blood back then too). Then there was a strong sense of victory, of celebration, and jubilation. The bandits had been ousted and the country would thrive.
Bur that was not to be the case, because the bandits had not been ousted. One of the biggest bandits of all had set herself before the people as their saviour, as the one who was going to lead the country into the land of milk and honey. But she was as rotten as the rest of them, and her unbending megalomaniacal will would overturn the victory of the Orange Revolution and lead him whom shed ousted into the presidential chair.
She returned to Maidan on 22 February having been released from prison, clearly of the opinion she was going to take charge once again, but her words were nothing but empty rhetoric. Everyone had heard it before. But this time round people have wised up and no one believed any of it.
So why no sense of victory now, no celebration, or jubilation? The people know almost everyone in the former Verkhovna Rada is rotten to the core. Those there now appear to be doing the right things, but everyone knows theyre also capable of doing the wrong thing as soon as the peoples attention is diverted. So the people cannot let their attention be diverted. In truth, the people of this land have won a great battle, but the war is not over yet.
I would ask, why do we need the fools on the hill at all? Perhaps Ukraine now has a chance to develop a grassroots, ground up democracy like weve never seen before. Give people power and it corrupts them, so just dont give them the power. We have the technology now. Most people have internet access, and those who dont can access it easyily enough. So why not do away with the politicians and replace them with administrators, and have the people make the decisions by online voting? Wouldnt that be good? Its possible. And its easy.
As you probably already know, if youve read the letter earlier in this magazine, this is the last one of these I will be writing for the next few weeks. But I know when we return this country will be better. It will be well on the road to the place the people want it to be, the place they now so deserve it to be. I foresee a great Ukraine ahead. A country that finally realises its massive potential, where there is freedom, justice, and wealth for everyone!
SLAVA UKRAINI!

Neil Campbell

Kyiv Top Five
For our last Top 5 for awhile, we decided to take a look at the magazine itself and predict what the most popular rubrics among our readers are. Of course, you may surprise us with your comments while on leave.

1. Kyiv Life and Clubbers Ukrainians love having their picture, and we take that a step further than what you can find on social media websites.
2. Whats Up Bringing you a tongue-in-check look at the weeks news, this is often a favourite of readers in Kyiv for the long haul.
3. Take Me Out Look, read and let your mouth water after learning about fabulous dishes found right here in Kyiv that you too can try.
4. Publishers Provocations Our publisher often gets his panties in a knot, providing entertaining reading, not to mention the tweets, the jokes, and the piss-take of idiotic behaviour in the country.
5. This Week and Coming Soon listings Its the most up-to-date rundown of events in Kyiv; who wouldnt love it?

Tweets
Counting the damage, some colourful language, small celebration, and looking forward. As Ukraine weeps for the fallen and confronts the challenges ahead, Twitter helps the countrys people to remember who they are slava Ukraini! These are our tweets of the week.
Roman (@Roman100) sizes up the state of the streets:
Kyiv suffered three shattering devastations: Genghis Khan 1240; Adolf Hitler 1941; Victor Yanukovych 2014 #Ukraine
Fighting talk from Sh*t Ukrainians Say (@Sh*tUkesSay):
I bleed blue and sh*t yellow
Vlad Wallace (@V_Wallace) from across the Atlantic:
Ukrainian president impeached... Five minutes later my mom is blasting the national anthem in our house
We couldnt agree more, Leonid Ragozin (@leonidragozin):
Kyiv is a great city, but feels much better without Yanukovych

Whats Hot
The Museum of Corruption
Thats what Ukrainians labelled Yanukovychs estate after making field trips to Mezhyhirya, 12 kilometres from Kyiv, at the weekend. They found a monument to greed, corruption and astoundingly poor taste, the worst of which was possibly a full-scale galleon, imaginatively called Galleon. Then there were the receipts, one for $12 million in cash, and another for $10 million, cutlery for one of the buildings costing in excess of $1 million...the list goes on. But if there was an indication of who these people really are, it was spelled out in one photo of an extravagant bowl on a lavishly gilded dressing table. Its contents? Sunflower seed husks; under the bowl some napkins were arranged to catch the husks that missed when they were spat out.

Whats Not
The Gas Princess Returns
While many are genuinely glad that Yulia Tymoshenko no longer languishes in prison. Lets be honest when we say few of us want to see her return to politics. Tymoshenko should stay in the past which Ukrainians so painfully fought to bid farewell to. Ukraine has won the right to determine a new future with new leaders. Sorry Yulia, its time for you to go enjoy your freedom.


Kyiv Cartoon
Viktor Yanukovych and Andriy Tsarev are shopping in Monaco.
Tsarev says, Look at this beautiful tie, and a bargain, at only $3,000!
Yanukovych looks at the tie and scoffs, I bought the same tie for $5,000 around the corner!

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Comments (1)
You are not authorized! Only registered and authorized users can add their comments!
Claudia | 29.05.2014 19:56

Yes Ukraine and Italy have a lot in common. My Italian frdines why are also engaged in Ukraine say the same. Obviously your Ukrainian background is a catholic background which indicates that you do not really represent the broader Ukrainian community, but that should not and does not undermine your comments and observations.


 
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Read also:
  • Provocations & Observations (#6)
  • Provocations & Observations (#5)
  • Provocations & Observations (#4)
  • Provocations & Observations (#3)
  • Provocations & Observations (#2)

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    Ukraine Truth
    Rights We Didnt Know We Had

    Throughout EuroMaidan much has been made of Ukrainians making a stand for their rights. What exactly those rights are were never clearly defined. Ukraine ratified the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1952. The first article of the Declaration states all human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights, they are endowed with reason and conscience, and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood. The ousted and overthrown Ukrainian government showed to the world they dont understand the meaning of these words.


    Kyiv Culture

    Pulling Strings
    Located on Hrushevskoho Street the epicentre of EuroMaidan violence, home to battles, blazes and barricades childrens favourite the Academic Puppet Theatre had to shut down in February. Nevertheless, it is getting ready to reopen this March with a renewed repertoire to bring some laughter back to a scene of tragedy. Operating (not manipulating) puppets is a subtle art that can make kids laugh and adults cry. Whats On meets Mykola Petrenko, art director of the Theatre, to learn more about those who pull the strings behind the show.

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